Dilation & Extraction aka Partial-Birth Abortion

At seven or eight months gestation the foetus's muscles and cartilage at this stage have toughened to the point where it is virtually impossible to dismember it without harming the mother.
  • The abortionist also faces the prospect of the "serious complication" -- a live, crying newborn baby.
  • He therefore uses forceps to twist one of the foetus's legs and pull it out through the birth canal. This often rips muscles and breaks the bones.
  • At this point the baby has been entirely delivered except for the head.
  • The surgeon then forces the scissors into the base of the skull.
  • The surgeon removes the scissors and introduces a suction catheter into this hole and evacuates the skull contents. He then removes the corpse.
Abortionist Martin Haskell originated the D & X procedure because "... most surgeons find dismemberment [i.e., D & E] at twenty weeks and beyond to be difficult due to the toughness of fetal tissues at this stage of development."

Haskell, told a 1992 National Abortion Federation (NAF) conference that he had performed more than 700 late second-trimester and third-trimester D & X killings.

An abortionist considering a (D&X) Partial Birth Abortion has two problems. He wants to abort a viable foetus of seven or eight months gestation who has an 80 percent chance of surviving birth. The foetus's muscles and cartilage at this stage have toughened to the point where it is virtually impossible to dismember it without harming the mother.

Since the foetus is probably viable, the abortionist also faces the prospect of the "serious complication" -- a live, crying newborn baby. Therefore, he must make sure the foetus dies before he or she is fully "delivered."

He uses forceps to twist one of the foetus's legs and pull it out through the birth canal.

What happens next, in Martin Haskell's words is this:

"At this point [after the baby has been entirely delivered except for the head], the right-handed surgeon slides the fingers of the left hand along the back of the fetus and "hooks" the shoulders of the fetus with the index and ring fingers (palm down).

"Next he slides the tip of the middle finger along the spine, towards the skull, while applying traction to the shoulders and lower extremities. The middle finger lifts and pushes the anterior cervical lip out of the way.

"While maintaining this tension, lifting the cervix and applying traction to the shoulders with the fingers of the left hand, the surgeon takes a pair of blunt curved Metzenbaum scissors in the right hand. He carefully advances the tip, curved down, along the spine and under his middle finger until he feels it contact the base of the skull under the tip of his middle finger.

"Reassessing proper placement of the closed scissors tip and safe elevation of the cervix, the surgeon then forces the scissors into the base of the skull or into the foramen magnum [the large opening in the occipital bone between the cranial cavity and the spinal canal].

"Having safely entered the skull, he spreads the scissors to enlarge the opening. The surgeon removes the scissors and introduces a suction catheter into this hole and evacuates the skull contents. With the catheter still in place, he applies traction to the fetus, removing it completely from the patient."

This links to drawings of the procedure.