Abortionists and Fertility Clinics

Abortion and Infertility

Any procedure that dilates the cervix, which is a necessary step during most abortions, can weaken it. Abortion can cause or contribute to infertility in several ways.

  • Damage to the cervix can affect the ability of the embryo to implant, cause miscarriage or pre-term labour..
  • Repeat abortions can cause severe scarring of the uterus which can cause the uterus to tighten up or even close up completely.
  • Unexplained infertility may sometimes be caused by the presence of foetal bone fragments.
  • Complications following abortion gives a higher chance or fertility problems.
  • The implantation of multiple embryos is often followed by 'selective reduction'.
  • Patients are encouraged to donate 'surplus' embryos for experimentation.
In some cases, multiple dilations and curettages (D&C) may cause some scarring at the top of the cervix or inside the uterus.

Any procedure that dilates (opens) the cervix, which is a necessary step during most abortions, can weaken it.

It can affect the ability of an embryo to implant into the uterus or the ability of the cervix to support a pregnancy.

Women who have had more than one abortion and get pregnant again later on, may find that they have what's known as an incompetent cervix ? a cervix that starts dilating prematurely.

This can sometimes be treated with a stitch to keep the cervix closed. Repeated abortions can cause severe scarring of the uterus. Large amounts of scar tissue can cause your uterus to tighten up or even close up completely. Scar tissue can usually be seen with a hysterosalpingogram, or HSG.

If a woman experienced complications with her abortion, such as a large amount of bleeding or pain, her chances are higher for fertility problems.

Foetal Bone Fragments
Unexplained infertility in otherwise healthy women may sometimes be caused by the presence of foetal bone fragments left embedded in the uterus after a previous abortion, causing a chronic irritation that prevents implantation.


Dr Benny, medical director of the Centre, has stated that there are 3,000 spare embryos in frozen storage left over from IVF treatments. He is encouraging parents to donate these embryos for experimentation.

Right to Life New Zealand campaigns to protect the rights of the spare/unused embryos, saying that they could be given up for adoption.

The CDHB has endeavoured without success to obtain information on the fate of these embryos. Dr Benny in a reply has advised that these embryos are "non viable" and that experimentation on these embryos have ethic committee approval. His Centre is not subject to the Official Information Act.

The Minister of Health has now ruled that where District Health Boards have a shareholding in IVF clinics they will now be subject to the Official Information Act.

The National Ethics Committee on Assisted Human Reproduction (NECAHR) is currently giving consideration to giving ethical permission to IVF clinics to give "surplus" embryos out for adoption.